BLACKSHAWHEAD CHAPEL

BLACKSHAWHEAD CHAPEL

lifestyle

 
 


                                       






















LIVE SIMPLY, SO THAT OTHERS MIGHT SIMPLY LIVE

The way we live out our lives, the lifestyle patterns and consumer choices that we make, have enormous impact upon our neighbours, our fellow humans, and our planet. We believe that we are here to act as stewards of our world, leaving it a better place than we found it rather than plundering it for our own gain.

This page contains some jottings and references we have gathered together over the years about living an ethical lifestyle -  “living faithfully in God’s world” as we might say.

The first thing needed is to accept that this ‘ethical lifestyle’ has a cost, since we make our choices not on what is the cheapest or best economic value, but what is in the best interests of our world.  This may mean paying more, or settling for a different choice.

This page is still being built - your

suggestions would be welcome.

You can email us here

The jam-buying dilemma. 
Suppose you want some jam. Do you :
Buy the cheapest, which might be exploiting others and the planet?
Buy fairtrade, knowing that the world’s poorest people will benefit, although it has probably travelled halfway round the world?*
Buy locally, to reduce “food miles” and thus the impact on the planet?
Make your own - and if so on what basis do you source the ingredients?

There is no one simple answer, (except that (a) is probably not the correct one!) but the important thing is that you make your choice on an informed and thought-through basis, in line with your lifestyle preferences, and not simply on cost alone.

The jam-buying dilemma.

Suppose you want some jam. Do you :

  1. a)Buy the cheapest, which might be exploiting others and the planet?

  2. b)Buy fairtrade, knowing that the world’s poorest people will benefit, although it has probably travelled halfway round the world?*

  3. c)Buy locally, to reduce “food miles” and thus the impact on the planet?

  4. d)Make your own - and if so on what basis do you source the ingredients?


There is no one simple answer, (except that (a) is probably not the correct one!) but the important thing is that you make your choice on an informed and thought-through basis, in line with your lifestyle preferences, and not simply on cost alone.

A simple fourfold response checklist for consumer choice:
When faced with the opportunity (temptation?) to buy something, respond according to the following hierarchy of questions :
REJECT - “Do I really need it?”
REDUCE - “Do I really need so much?”
RE-USE - “Do I already have something that will do the job?”
RECYCLE - “What can I give back/hand on if if I get this?”

If your purchase passes all the tests you can probably justify it!!

A simple fourfold response checklist for consumer choice:

When faced with the opportunity (temptation?) to buy something, respond according to the following hierarchy of questions :

  1. 1.REJECT - “Do I really need it?”

  2. 2.REDUCE - “Do I really need so much?”

  3. 3.RE-USE - “Do I already have something that will do the job?”

  4. 4.RECYCLE - “What can I give back/hand on if if I get this?”


If your purchase passes all the tests you can probably justify it!!

* FAIR TRADE
We are an accredited Fairtrade Church, and all 
our tea and coffee is Fairtrade.
If what you buy does not bear the Fairtrade Mark 
it is probably not fairly traded, and may be 
harming the world’s most vulnerable people,  (although other marks, such as Rainforest Alliance, have their own ethical standards).
If it isn’t fairly traded it may well be cheaper to buy, and this is probably because the vulnerable ‘third world’ producers are being exploited by large conglomerates, by not being paid a fair price or not having adequate working conditions and social provisions.
If you will not take a stand for Fair Trade who will?
If no-one takes a stand by insisting on Fairly Traded goods they will disappear from supermarket shelves and the commercial exploiters will have won!

* FAIR TRADE

We are an accredited Fairtrade Church, and all

our tea and coffee is Fairtrade.

If what you buy does not bear the Fairtrade Mark

it is probably not fairly traded, and may be

harming the world’s most vulnerable people,  (although other marks, such as Rainforest Alliance, have their own ethical standards).

If it isn’t fairly traded it may well be cheaper to buy, and this is probably because the vulnerable ‘third world’ producers are being exploited by large conglomerates, by not being paid a fair price or not having adequate working conditions and social provisions.

If you will not take a stand for Fair Trade who will?

If no-one takes a stand by insisting on Fairly Traded goods they will disappear from supermarket shelves and the commercial exploiters will have won!

WHAT TO DO WITH THE MONEY YOU SAVE BY THE ABOVE TEST :

There is a simple biblical principle called ‘Tithing”.
This means setting aside a tenth of your possessions (income?) to be used for the benefit of others and not yourself (traditionally tithes were “set aside for God”)
You could give to charity, maybe by direct debits, or keep it in a separate account to spend on ‘good causes’ that chime with your spirit.

Try it and you will be amazed at not only how you manage without it, but at the way it transforms your life!

WHAT TO DO WITH THE MONEY YOU SAVE BY THE ABOVE TEST :


There is a simple biblical principle called ‘Tithing”.

This means setting aside a tenth of your possessions (income?) to be used for the benefit of others and not yourself (traditionally tithes were “set aside for God”)

You could give to charity, maybe by direct debits, or keep it in a separate account to spend on ‘good causes’ that chime with your spirit.


Try it and you will be amazed at not only how you manage without it, but at the way it transforms your life!